ART NOUVEAU CHAIR BY GEORGES DE FEURE

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ART NOUVEAU CHAIR BY GEORGES DE FEURE

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Georges De Feure Art Nouveau armchair awaiting re-upholstery.

A beautiful armchair in carved cuban mahogany

A chair of this design was exhibited by  Georges de Feure in his boudoir of the Pavillon de l'Art Nouveau Bing at the Paris Exposition Universelle, 1900.

The term Art Nouveau was initiated when Siegfreid Bing opened a gallery named l'Art Nouveau in Paris in 1895. As Troy (op.cit., p.35) notes, Pavillon de l'Art Nouveau Bing at the Paris Exposition was a freestanding rectangular building, the exterior with decorative paintings by de Feure, intended to embody the unification of French Decorative Arts. In its arrangement of six rooms and a passageway Bing abandoned the accepted commercial display of objects in favour of a more natural and dressed presentation in the manner of a luxurious home. The talents of designers Edward Colonna, Eugène Gaillard and Georges de Feure were channelled into one or more of the rooms, including a dining room, music room, dressing room and bedroom. After the opening they were credited with creating a harmonious interior that presented the then challenging Art Nouveau style in an acceptable light. Mourey summed up the very favourable reaction to the Boudoir in particular:

"What M.S. Bing and M. de Feure have dared to do here, with still more audacity and also more temerity than in the other rooms that compose the House of l'Art Nouveau, is to try - and I hasten to affirm that they have succeeded - to renew those entirely French traditions of grace, finesse, elegance and, of course, luxury".

There were other notable favourable critical responses to the boudoir and the furniture from that room was purchased out of the the Pavilion by various foreign museums 'anxious to acquire examples of highly acclaimed French modern design as models for emulation and adaption at home' (Troy, p.42). Given the success, Bing quickly ordered new examples to be made and it is possible that the current lot was produced by de Feure to furnish a luxury Salon at the rue de Provence gallery in 1901.

POA

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